Lisa J. Mails Elementary

"I AM" POEMS:
It's interesting to see how students' self-concepts might change during the school year, and you can offer them the chance to share any insights or describe themselves with this "I Am" poetry format. They will simply follow directions to fill in the blanks; great for either a beginning of the year or end of the year writing exercise.

WHAT DOES A BEE SEE?
Students will be invited into the micro world with this art lesson, where they envision what the world looks like to a bee or butterfly, then draw and color the results.

WRITING POETRY WITH JACK PRELUTSKY:
[LINK2]
You've had a full month to explore poetry with your class during National Poetry Month, but don't stop there! Continue the fun and discovery with this online workshop for students, with United States Children's Poet Laureate Jack Prelutsky. Some wonderful audio clips are available for this early elementary writing workshop, along with a Teacher's Guide at the 2nd link above.
 
INSTANT POETRY FORMS:
In this interactive literacy tool, students will simply enter their words into the boxes to generate a poem. Several different formats are available.
 
10 POETRY ACTIVITIES:
Save these activities for National Poetry Month in April, or even better, start using them now and explore the wonderful world of poetry with your students. I like the idea of creating a Poetry Kit - you could incorporate this activity into your weekly writing plans by having one day set aside where you - or someone else - brings in a paper bag with various, intriguing items in it. Students can use those items to connect in a poem, offering them a history together, a narrative, a biography, personification, or... ?
 
Poem in Your Pocket Day --April 30th
Last Modified on May 2, 2009